Congratulations on your news!

If you smoke, this is one of the first steps you can take towards having a healthy pregnancy.

Most mums know smoking whilst pregnant isn’t good for them or their baby, but that doesn’t make it easier to quit. We know that it can be difficult to stop smoking especially with everyone giving you different advice, pregnancy is stressful enough.  But then, you may not be aware of the harm cigarettes are doing to your baby…

Effects

You know that smoking is bad for you, but do you know the real extent of how smoking can be bad for you and your unborn baby?

Your baby depends on you for everything – you supply your baby with food, oxygen and nutrients to enable your baby to grow.

What you put into your body will affect the growth and health of the baby as some of the smoking toxins cross the placenta from your bloodstream directly to the baby’s bloodstream.

The placenta is linked to your baby by the umbilical cord, poisonous smoke toxins travel through the placenta into the umbilical cord to your baby.

Unfortunately your baby is not protected from cigarette smoke whilst in the amniotic sac (bag of fluid made of membranes).

The health risks of smoking to the body

Click on the body parts to reveal the risks!

Effects of smoking on Mums' mouth

Smokers are five times more likely to develop eclampsia which is a major cause of maternal mortality in the UK.

Effects of smoking on Mums' lungs

Smoking or secondhand smoke goes into the lungs which damages them and can make breathing more difficult.

Effects of smoking on babies' head

Due to the oxygen in mum’s blood being replaced by carbon monoxide, the supply of oxygen to the baby is restricted.  This can affect the babies growth.

Smokers are more likely to deliver babies prematurely and at a much lower birth weight. This could mean a poorly, weaker baby who struggles with the delivery.

Effects of smoking on babies' lungs

Smoking during pregnancy can damage your babies airways before they are born.

If you smoke during pregnancy your child may develop smaller airways, making them more vulnerable to breathing problems such as asthma.

Research has shown airflow through the breathing tubes is on average 20% lower in babies born to mothers who smoke.

Effects of smoking on babies' heart

A babys heart beats faster when the Mum is a smoker, this is to make up for getting less oxygen.  This means that essentially the babies heart is working much harder to receive oxygen around the body.

Effects of smoking on babies' bloodstream

Over 4000 chemicals are absorbed into your bloodstream including chemicals like ammonia (toilet cleaner) and arsenic (poison).  Another chemical is carbon monoxide which replaces oxygen in your blood and starves the body tissue of oxygen vital to repair, regenerate and daily normal living.

This means that the oxygen supply to your baby may be less and restricted.

Effects of smoking on the placenta

The placenta is the lifeline for the baby. Smoking increases risks of bleeding, placenta abruption (detaches/peels away) placenta praevia (low lying placenta).

Women who stop smoking during the first three months of pregnancy have a lower rate of placental abruption and a lower rate of placenta praevia compared to continuing smokers. It is never too late to stop smoking whilst pregnant.

Effects of smoking on Mums' mouth

Smokers are five times more likely to develop eclampsia which is a major cause of maternal mortality in the UK.

Effects of smoking on Mums' lungs

Smoking or secondhand smoke goes into the lungs which damages them and can make breathing more difficult.

Effects of smoking on babies' head

Due to the oxygen in mum’s blood being replaced by carbon monoxide, the supply of oxygen to the baby is restricted.  This can affect the babies growth.

Smokers are more likely to deliver babies prematurely and at a much lower birth weight. This could mean a poorly, weaker baby who struggles with the delivery.

Effects of smoking on babies' lungs

Smoking during pregnancy can damage your babies airways before they are born.

If you smoke during pregnancy your child may develop smaller airways, making them more vulnerable to breathing problems such as asthma.

Research has shown airflow through the breathing tubes is on average 20% lower in babies born to mothers who smoke.

Effects of smoking on babies' heart

A babys heart beats faster when the Mum is a smoker, this is to make up for getting less oxygen.  This means that essentially the babies heart is working much harder to receive oxygen around the body.

Effects of smoking on babies' bloodstream

Over 4000 chemicals are absorbed into your bloodstream including chemicals like ammonia (toilet cleaner) and arsenic (poison).  Another chemical is carbon monoxide which replaces oxygen in your blood and starves the body tissue of oxygen vital to repair, regenerate and daily normal living.

This means that the oxygen supply to your baby may be less and restricted.

Effects of smoking on the placenta

The placenta is the lifeline for the baby. Smoking increases risks of bleeding, placenta abruption (detaches/peels away) placenta praevia (low lying placenta).

Women who stop smoking during the first three months of pregnancy have a lower rate of placental abruption and a lower rate of placenta praevia compared to continuing smokers. It is never too late to stop smoking whilst pregnant.

Smokefree Baby & Me

Here is a short video to highlight the harms of smoking whilst pregnant for you and your baby.
(if the video doesn't play, please paste https://1drv.ms/v/s!AoryKK07PhI-hvU5f8mhKosDjgiNrA into your OneDrive or Google Chrome)

Watch video

Smokefree Baby and Me

In Bedfordshire there is a programme called Smokefree Baby and Me which will give you support, advice and empowerment to help you stop smoking through your pregnancy and beyond.

Clinics and home visits are available to suit your needs.

 

Success Stories

Meet one of our Mums who stopped smoking with the support of the Smokefree Baby and Me program

Watch video

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